Now You See Me 2 Review

A look under the surface and what do you find? Something which would seem neat and tidy but it’s grand finale leaves anyone but guessing.

Right, where to start off? Going into the film, the characters are seemingly still carrying on one year later waiting to see what their society, the eye have planned for them next where the hijinks are taken to a whole new level. The purpose of the horsemen is to expose the people who lie to the public if only they could do the same with politicians am i right? So they expose a corrupt company to the world but whilst this is happening, the tables are turned and everything is exposed to the public. Moving on from here, it is revealed through simple science and misdirection that the horsemen have been tricked by tech entrepreneur Daniel Radcliffe.

Moving onto the actual heist, the horseman all put together a plan which seems absurd at its best but seems written carefully so the characters can at least have a bit of fun while they’re committing yet another crime to add to their books. Here, I think of the last film as a Russian nesting doll and with each more preposterous heist, the next doll comes out.

Staging a fight with actual magic, the Special Effects team had their work cut out for them, but the end results are well; magic. Something maybe even Houdini might have been proud of, you see the various tricks Mark Ruffalo has up his sleeve used to full effect but here we even see Jesse Eisenberg lost for words, stuck between the lunatic Lex Luthor he portrayed in Batman Vs Superman and Atlas from the previous film. By the time it’s reached it’s final chapter we arrive in London where the stages for the final act and their revenge are set into motion. Here I wonder if this big budget film is worth it. Yes, it meant more stars and bigger escapades but needless to say, there are some parts which could’ve been used as a deleted scene, should one purchase when it is released later in the year. Although, the climax is greatly needed at this point, what is  produced  is a climax which is fairly unperceptive.

Stuck between the flair for a fumbling dramatic, director Jon chu struggles to find the right style of storytelling but doesn’t necessarily find one which has an element of surprise. Behind the curtain of all the tricks and misdirection,  we see the real heroes of the film in the effects department who through all the dazzling lights find a light at the end of the tunnel who scrape together something  which is considered watchable and only through the actors and crews teamwork. We can only hope the next time we see the horsemen, more elaborate tricks are shown with a fitting conclusion to satisfy its budget needs, should this film rach a third.